Recent Graduate Jenna Wise Awarded NSF Fellowship

Jenna WiseJenna Wise, a recent computer science and mathematics graduate, has been awarded a 2017 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. 2,000 STEM students nationwide were awarded out of a pool of more than 13,000 applicants.

The fellowship program recognizes students for their academic efforts while pursuing a research-based, graduate-level degree in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics.

Jenna’s name may sound familiar to many because of her strong presence here at YSU:

  • Webmaster and former president of Pi Mu Epsilon
  • President and former vice president of the Association for Computing Machinery–Women
  • Tutor at the Mathematics Assistance Center
  • Student researcher in the Software Engineering Research and Empirical Studies Laboratory (CSIS Department under Dr. Sharif)
  • 2016 Barry Goldwater Scholarship recipient
  • Author and co-author of several math and computer science publications

With many activities and accomplishments under her belt, Jenna has already compiled an impressive resume through all of her hard work.

She has worked on NSF-funded research in the past, including her eye-tracking research with Dr. Sharif which was also the basis of her senior project.

Jenna is spending her summer as an intern for IBM Research before attending Carnegie Mellon University for her PhD studies in the fall.

Check out this article from YSU News to read more about Jenna and her award.

View details about the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program here.

Student Organization Spotlight: Association for Computing Machinery

Each month, we try to highlight a student organization in STEM to show everyone what they do and why they’re an important part of STEM. This month, the Association for Computing Machinery is our featured organization.

ACM logo

The ACM is actually a much larger organization that is composed of many professional and university chapters. Here at YSU, all CSIS majors are welcome to join and to attend meetings and presentations.

The new student president of YSU’s chapter, Ricky Elrod, explains that students and faculty alike have given presentations on a wide range of topics.

“We’ve had presentations on bitcoin, on Linux-related stuff, on functional programming, robotics—all sorts of computer-science-related subfields,” said Ricky.

Students are also given opportunities to collaborate with others that share their interests in “hack” sessions. Similar to a hackathon, students bring computers and small projects that they work on with other students who attend.

One major goal of YSU’s ACM is to get students interacting with one another (and with faculty) and learning from one another.

Ricky says that another goal for the future of the group is to try to work more with the local professional chapter in Northeast Ohio. He says that networking is a strong asset within the organization.

Students interested in joining or learning more about the ACM can check out their Facebook page or e-mail student president Ricky Elrod.

News For CS&IS

A new student association, Information Technology Student Association (ITSA), has been established in the department of Computer Science & Information Systems. The goals of ITSA are (1) to stimulate student interest in information technology field, (2) to seek networking opportunities between students within the department and companies doing business in information technology field in the region, (3) to help CS&IS department publicize Information Technology field to the university and the public. Membership is open to anyone who is interested in Information Technology at YSU. Some of the initiatives ITSA has taken are opening a facebook account, Department of Computer Science and Information Systems, and a twitter account at YSU_CSIS for the CS&IS department.

Retirees: Tom Bodnovich

Tom Bodnovich
Associate Professor and Chair
Computer Science and Information Systems

Tom Bodnovich retired in August of this year celebrating a 29 year career at the University. He received his BS degree in Computer Science at YSU in 1979. He returned to the University in 1982 as an analyst designing computer information systems used in the administrative operation of the University. He was vital in the adoption of a relational database paradigm, and he structured numerous programming techniques.

He began teaching in 1988 as an instructor of Computer Technology in the Engineering Technology Department. He became assistant professor in 1996 and associate professor in 2001. He was ultimately appointed Chair of Computer Science and Information Systems in 2006.

Tom said, “The most satisfying accomplishment was helping students to succeed academically and preparing them for productive and fulfilling lives beyond college.” He added that the people of YSU are like an extended family for him, and he treasures the relationships he developed. Tom plans to travel, spend more time with family and friends, and resume his love for golf.