Register for this year’s STEM Showcase!

Each year, STEMians come together to highlight our students and the projects that they’ve worked on throughout the year. This year’s STEM Showcase will be Saturday, April 25, from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Moser Hall. Come out to support our students and to see what great things they’ve been putting together this year! Along with seeing all the projects, you’ll have the opportunity to tour YSU STEM facilities, including our new Center for Innovation in Additive Manufacturing!

This year, $1000 in scholarship money will be awarded at the STEM Showcase. Prospective students are eligible if they attend the showcase and complete a short survey at the event. The award will be applied when the student enrolls in the STEM College at YSU.

Previous projects have included the Baja Car, the Concrete Canoe, and some nanoflowers.

STEM students who want to register their project should visit stemshowcase.ysustem.com.

STEMians: Scholarship Information! Read how to get assistance for next academic year

Welcome back, STEMians! Now is the perfect time to begin filling out applications for scholarships for next academic year. Below is a list of scholarships available to STEM majors (check out the financial aid website for additional scholarship opportunities), as well as links to applications. All of this information can also be found here.

Applications are due by February 15. Many of the scholarships listed require FAFSA to be completed, so please complete your FAFSA prior to February 15.

Be sure to like STEM Scholarships on Facebook so you can stay up to date on the latest scholarships!

 

Current Students

STEM Common Application

Over 30 scholarships are available for current STEM students through the STEM Scholarship Application. By completing this one application, you will be considered for all available STEM College Scholarships for which you qualify for that academic year. Completed applications must be submitted by 5pm on February 15th every year to be considered for the following academic year. Most scholarships require that a FAFSA also be completed.

For a full list of scholarships awarded through the STEM Scholarship Application, Click Here

APPLY ON-LINE HERE. You can also find scholarship applications, along with additional information, on the scholarship board outside of the Dean’s Office in Moser Hall, Room 2200.

 

Myron Wick Scholarship in Science and Engineering: CLICK HERE FOR APPLICATION

  • Available to full-time Junior and Senior Chemistry, Physics, Geology, Environmental Science, and Engineering Majors
  • Minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Deadline: February 15

Builders Association of Eastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania Scholarship: CLICK HERE FOR APPLICATION

Carol Lamb 330-941-4625

  • Available for majors in Civil And Construction Engineering Technology
  • Deadline: July 1

Alan Jacobs Achievement in Environmental Studies: CLICK HERE FOR APPLICATION

Geology and Environmental Science Department, Moser Hall 2120

  • Refund for the cost of the textbook for students who receive an A in ENST 1500
  • Deadline: 5 days before the end of the term

Ann Harris Scholarship: Geology and Environmental Science Department, Moser Hall 2120

  • For Junior and Senior Geology majors with at least a 3.5 toward the cost of a summer field camp
  • Deadline: March 1

Donald Marcy Scholarship: Biological Sciences Department, Ward Beecher Hall 4037

  • For sophomore, junior, and senior Biology majors with at least a 2.5
  • Deadline: February 15

John and Lina Moteff Scholarship: Physics Department, Ward Beecher Hall 2023 CLICK HERE FOR APPLICATION

  • Available to science majors with first preference to incoming physics majors
  • Deadline: February 15

Dr. Ronald A. Parise Scholarship: Physics Department, Ward Beecher Hall 2023

  • Awarded to physics majors with at least a 3.0 GPA, preference to Mahoning and Trumbull residents
  • Deadline: February 15

Help A Sister Out: Sherri Lovelace-Cameron, Ward Beecher Hall 5016 CLICK HERE FOR APPLICATION

  • Awarded to full-time graduate and undergraduate female African American students majoring in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics with minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Deadline: March 15

Additional Resources for current students

 

Incoming Students

First-time STEM students are encouraged to apply for one of our several scholarships available to incoming students. See details below for deadlines and application information.

 

STEM Scholarship Common Application

Although most of these scholarships require at least sophomore level status, by completing this one application, you will be considered for all available STEM College Scholarships for which you qualify for that academic year, in the event that a new scholarship becomes available. Completed applications must be submitted by 5pm on February 15th every year to be considered for the following academic year. Most scholarships require that a FAFSA also be completed.

For a full list of scholarships awarded through the STEM Scholarship Application, Click Here

APPLY ON-LINE HERE. You can also find scholarship applications, along with additional information, on the scholarship board outside of the Dean’s Office in Moser Hall, Room 2200.

 

Choose Ohio First Scholarship Program

Available to incoming students who place into the minimum math required for their major (Pre-Calculus or Calculus) and have at least a 2.5 high school GPA. Preference is given to students from our partner schools (Austintown Fitch, Boardman, Campbell Memorial, Chaney, East, Girard, Hubbard, Liberty, Lowellville, McDonald, Niles McKinley, Struthers, Warren Harding, Youngstown Early College), but all applications are accepted. Only 20-25 scholarship are awarded per year.

More info and application

APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 1st

FIRST Robotics Scholarship

Available to an incoming student who has participated for at least one year on a FIRST Robotics Team.

More info and application

APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 1st

John and Lina Moteff Scholarship

Preferably given to incoming students majoring in Physics. Those majoring in any science will be given secondary consideration.

Click here for application

More info

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 15th

Mathematical Modeling of Fracking Chemical Dispersion in Groundwater

Dozens of Youngstown State University graduate and undergraduate students showcased their scholarly achievements at the 22nd annual QUEST Forum for Student Scholarship on Tuesday, April 3 in Kilcawley Center.

The project chosen by Scott Brand, Sean Gabriel, Michael Hernandez, Jessie Grimm, Brian Crawford and Paul Jones was the Mathematical Modeling of Fracking Chemical Dispersion in Groundwater. A major concern in finding fuel sources in shale deposits underground is the brine solution, used in fracking and containing many harmful chemicals, dispersing into the groundwater above these shale deposits.  If it could be determined how the brine solution ends up getting into the groundwater, then maybe this water pollution could be prevented altogether or another way to break up the shale could be found.

Pictured are (left) Brian Crawford and (right) Scott Brand in front of their poster during the Quest presentation.

To model the ground, semi-permeable marbles in a clear plastic column were used; and to model the brine solution, saltwater solutions of different conductivities were created (it was assumed that the chemicals moved with the salt).  Water and the different salt solutions were pumped up through the vertical column, and the conductivity was measured on a computer program called LoggerPro by conductivity probes inserted into the side of the column.  From the data and using an equation model, it could be determined whether the solutions were traveling in plug-flow manner-one solution right after the other-or mixing-where the two solutions mix and do not flow one solution after the other-by finding the diffusivity of the one solution into the other.  It was found that plug-flow dominated as the conductivity increased, whereas mixing occurred when switching back to a lower conductive solution.  In fact, the difference in diffusivity from switching from pure water to a salt solution and from a salt solution to pure water again was a factor of 100.  Future studies could analyze exactly what factor is causing this to occur and what is the best way to prevent this mixing.